Dating Violence

Dating Violence

"Please realize that these things DO happen. You may think to yourself 'oh that will never be me' and then suddenly you find yourself in a bad relationship, and a scary situation."

Caity, survivor of a violent dating relationship

February is Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month

This Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month media toolkit was created with community-based prevention professionals and organizations engaging in primary prevention in mind.  However, primary prevention concerns us all and if you are interested in sharing prevention messaging during the month of February, we encourage you to use this toolkit and add strength to our number of partners joining together on this effort.

 

Teen Dating Violence Data

Data from the Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) was used to determine how many students in grades 9-12 in Utah experienced dating violence. The UDOH has conducted the YRBS for more than 20 years. The results are used to guide health promotion efforts on a variety of issues ranging from lifestyle choices to violence and injury prevention. 

In 2017, among Utah teens who were dating or going out with someone: 

  • More than one in four (26.5%) students were verbally or emotionally harmed by someone they were dating or going out with one or more times during the past 12 months (33.2% of females and 19.7% of males).
  • More than one out of every 11 students were forced by someone they were dating or going out with to do sexual things they did not want to do during the past 12 months.
  • Almost twice as many females (9.6% of females compared to 5.1% of males) students were physically hurt on purpose by someone they were dating or going out with one or more times during the past 12 months.

What is Dating Violence?

Dating violence is verbal, emotional, physical, and/or sexual abuse in a dating relationship. A dating relationship is romantic or intimate in nature and not just a casual relationship.

What are the warning signs that someone is in a violent relationship?

Victims

  • Sudden changes in appearance
  • Avoids contact with family and friends
  • Spends all of free time with abuser
  • Cries a lot; moody
  • Is very stressed with physical symptoms
  • Sudden changes in behavior
  • Defends abuser and his/her actions

Abusers

  • Sudden and drastic mood swings
  • Acts macho or cocky
  • Jealous and controlling
  • Cruelty to animals and/or children
  • History of battering
  • Constantly checking on partner
  • Blames others for his/her problems

If you or someone you love is in a violent relationship, call these FREE hotlines open 24 hours a day/7 days a week.

If you or someone you love is in a violent relationship, call these FREE hotlines open 24 hours a day/7 days a week.

Utah Domestic Violence Link Line
1-800-897-LINK (5465)
Rape & Sexual Assault Crisis Line
1-888-421-1100

What can you do if you're in a violent dating relationship?

  • Decide that any abuse is too much
  • Tell someone you are being abused
  • Document your injuries
  • Call a local hotline for help
  • Fill out a personalized safety plan
  • Remember that it is NOT your fault you are being abused

How can you help a loved one who is in a violent dating relationship?

  • Learn all you can about abuse
  • Teach your loved one about abuse
  • Document the injuries you see
  • Call a local hotline for more resources
  • Listen to your loved one
  • Be patient!